Sightseeing Tours in Bahrain | Farhat Tours

Sightseeing Tours in Bahrain

Bait al Quran

Bait al Quran means house of Quran’s. It is one of the island’s most attractive pieces of architecture and is the home to an immensely fair and valuable collection of Islamic manuscripts collected from all around the Islamic world including North Africa, Iran, India and china along with number of rare Islamic artefacts like jewellery, gold ornamental glasses and utensils. The interesting collection of calligraphy prints and books dating back to 7th and 8th centuries are unique.

Ahmed Al Fateh Grand Mosque

Set against the backdrop of palm trees and the sea, the Grand Mosque strikes a beautiful picture. With its exquisite Bahraini architecture, crowned by the world’s largest fiberglass dome and blessed with tranquility reserved for the holiest of holy places, The Grand Mosque truly lives up to its name. Though non-Muslim visitors are welcome, it is important to dress modestly, cover your head (for women) and take your shoes off before entering.

Bahrain National Museum

Bahrain World Trade Center

The Bahrain World Trade Center (also called Bahrain WTC or BWTC) is a 240 m (787 ft) high twin tower complex located in Manama, Bahrain. The towers were built in 2008. It is the first skyscraper in the world to integrate wind turbines into its design.

King Fahad Causeway

Opened in 1986, this remarkable 25km feat of engineering links Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. It is one of the most expensive bridges in the world. The causeway traverses Umm Nasan Island, which is a sanctuary for wildlife, and at halfway point there is a facility area, including one tower restaurant, which you can visit even if you don’t travel the whole distance to Saudi Arabia. Note: Panoramic View Watchtower is under construction

Bahrain Fort

Thought to be once the centre of power for the ancient Dilmun civilisation, Qalat al Bahrain (Bahrain Fort) has UNESCO World Heritage status. The Bahrain Fort occupies a strategic military position where the navigation movement could be watched. Excavations have revealed ancient soldier’s barracks, horse stables, an ammunition depot, a secret passageway, ceramic utensils and Islamic and Chinese currency coins.

Bahrain Fort Museum

Royal Camel Farm

The Camel Farm owned by His Highness the late Shaikh Mohammed Bin Salman Al Khalifa, uncle of the current ruler. You can see the baby and old camels here, if they are not taken out for feeding.

Al Jasra Handicraft Center

Situated at the village of Jasra, the center is a significant tourist place of interest, in recognition of the fact that the ladies of this village are well-known for their skill in palm weaving. The center consist of a number of rooms displaying different traditional handicraft such as cloth weaving, pottery, Sadow (Bedouin weaving), Kuwaiti chests and traditional dhow models. The upper floor exhibition stalls display models of traditional living rooms and kitchens with their attractive traditional furniture. There is also a gift shop selling local handicrafts and souvenirs produced by people who have attended special training courses designed to preserve such handicraft. The Al Jasra Handicraft Center regularly organizes heritage festivals to display the traditional lifestyle of Bahrain’s old towns and villages.

Jasra House

It is the house where the former Amir of Bahrain shaikh Isa Bin Salman Al-Khalifa the Amir was born. The house was built in 1907 and was vacant since the thirties. Al Jasra house was renovated in1986 and has been open to the public since then. It indeed represents the traditional Bahraini House.

Ancient Burial Mounds

Notably scattered along large stretches of Sheikh Khalifa Highway, near the Hamad Town roundabout, these archaeological mounds are of great historical importance, going back to the Dilmun civilization in the third millennium BC. Other archaeological mounds, which go back to the Hellenistic period of Alexander, the Great (2500BC) are also found in various areas in Bahrain.

Shaikh Isa Bin Ali House

Shaikh Ebrahim Center

Founded by Sheikha Mai Bint Mohammed Al Khalifa in 2002, this cultural centre has its origins at the turn of the century when it was the site of a majlis hosted by her grandfather, Sheikh Ebrahim Al Khalifa, who once invited thinkers, politicians, poets and writers to gather every Monday to discuss various issues of the day. Now, once again, Monday nights see artists and intellectuals gathered here for lectures and performances in a state-of-the art auditorium. The organisation has also restored several of the areas local houses that had fallen into disrepair and are now devoted to different aspects of Bahraini culture.

Abdullah Al Zayed House

Kurar House

Mohammed Bin Faris House

The Mohammed bin Faris Sut Music House was opened on 12 September 2005 as a museum commemorating the achievements of the Bahraini singer and musician Mohammed bin Faris. Mohammed bin Faris was a master of a type of music that originated in the Arabian Gulf region, the Sut. Through his own compositions and mastery of the art form, Mohammed bin Faris brought Sut music to new heights and gave it a particularly Bahraini form. The Mohammed bin Faris Sut Music House is a reconstruction of Mohammed bin Faris’ house at site of the original building.

Arad Fort

Strategically located at a sea passage, the Arad fort is a typical example of Omani military architecture at the end of the 15th and early 16th centuries. This fort was once the site of fierce battles and underwent different construction phases. It is nicely illuminated at night and hosts seasonal festivals throughout the year.

Muharraq Souq

Smaller than Manama Souq, the Muharraq souq a wide range of merchandise and famed sweet shops. The oldest section of the souq, al Qaisariya, offers a charming shopping experience. Suq al Qaisariya is an integral component of the “Pearling; a testimony of an Island Economy” (UNESCO World Heritage Site).

Bahrain Fort

Thought to be once the centre of power for the ancient Dilmun civilisation, Qalat al Bahrain (Bahrain Fort) has UNESCO World Heritage status. The Bahrain Fort occupies a strategic military position where the navigation movement could be watched. Excavations have revealed ancient soldier’s barracks, horse stables, an ammunition depot, a secret passageway, ceramic utensils and Islamic and Chinese currency coins.

Bahrain Fort Museum

Royal Camel Farm

The Camel Farm owned by His Highness the late Shaikh Mohammed Bin Salman Al Khalifa, uncle of the current ruler. You can see the baby and old camels here, if they are not taken out for feeding.

King Fahad Causeway

Opened in 1986, this remarkable 25km feat of engineering links Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. It is one of the most expensive bridges in the world. The causeway traverses Umm Nasan Island, which is a sanctuary for wildlife, and at halfway point there is a facility area, including one tower restaurant, which you can visit even if you don’t travel the whole distance to Saudi Arabia. Note: Panoramic View Watchtower is under construction

Bahrain Fort

Thought to be once the centre of power for the ancient Dilmun civilisation, Qalat al Bahrain (Bahrain Fort) has UNESCO World Heritage status. The Bahrain Fort occupies a strategic military position where the navigation movement could be watched. Excavations have revealed ancient soldier’s barracks, horse stables, an ammunition depot, a secret passageway, ceramic utensils and Islamic and Chinese currency coins.

Barbar Temple

The Barbar Temple situated on the West Coast of Island and to the North of Saar Settlement. The Barbar archaeological site is consider part of the Dilmun Culture. The most recent of the three Barbar temples were discovered by a Danish archaeological team in 1954 and a further two temples were discovered on the site with the oldest dating back to 3000 BC. The temples were built of limestone blocks, believed to have been carved out from Jidda Island.

Saar Ancient Settlement

The settlement itself is located on a small but prominent eastern outcrop of a limestone ridge which provides about the only natural elevation in the northern part of Bahrain. Immediately west of the settlement, and on the highest part of the ridge, is the Saar burial field, while to the south there are two cemetery complexes of interconnected graves. The settlement is spread over an estimated area of between 15,000 and 23,000 sq m, of which 7,500 sq m was excavated by the end of the project. Saar is a well laid out settlement with a main street running up from the southeastern outskirts; a temple in the centre at the crossroads of the settlement; and two- and three-roomed buildings, constructed in rows with standard room plans and suites of domestic installations. Over 80 buildings, mainly houses, were investigated by the Expedition, as well as a well and a gypsum kiln.

Saar Burial Complex

The so-called ‘Honeycomb Cemetery-lies less than half-a-kilometre to the south of the Dilmun town. Here, there is a large number of interconnecting graves. Each one consisted of a rectangular chamber, usually enclosed by an arc of outer walling tacked on to the side of earlier cells, so that graves multiply outwards from the original single cell at the center. It is a type of burial unique to Bahrain. The cemetery has been excavated in its entirety.

Ancient Burial Mounds

Notably scattered along large stretches of Sheikh Khalifa Highway, near the Hamad Town roundabout, these archaeological mounds are of great historical importance, going back to the Dilmun civilization in the third millennium BC. Other archaeological mounds, which go back to the Hellenistic period of Alexander, the Great (2500 BC) are also found in various areas in Bahrain. The best preserved and most impressive mounds are the royal burial mounds in the village of A’ali.

Bab Al Bahrain Souq (Old Souq)

This Souq is one of the famous tourist spot in Bahrain. This souq is the major market place in Manama, the capital of Bahrain. This is a very lively market with many shoppers and traders offer their products to the customers. This shopping paradise houses shops trading all types of commodities. Travelers can choose their favorite items from the wide collection of fabrics, ornaments, spices, souvenirs, handicrafts, dry fruits, sweets and toffee